T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land Wiki
(Created page with " {| cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="margin:0pxauto;color:rgb(0,0,32);font-family:Times;font-size:medium;line-height:normal;" |'''Musing upon the king my brother’s...")
 
Line 7: Line 7:
 
| style="text-align:right;vertical-align:top;"|
 
| style="text-align:right;vertical-align:top;"|
 
|-
 
|-
|'''And on the king my father’s death before him.
+
|'''And on the king my father’s death before him.'''
'''
 
 
|}
 
|}
 
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-indent:.5in">[[File:761px-George_Romney_-_William_Shakespeare_-_The_Tempest_Act_I,_Scene_1_(1).jpg|thumb|400px|The Tempest]]</p>
 
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-indent:.5in">[[File:761px-George_Romney_-_William_Shakespeare_-_The_Tempest_Act_I,_Scene_1_(1).jpg|thumb|400px|The Tempest]]</p>
 <span style="text-indent:0.5in;">This line refers to Shakespeare’s The Tempest. </span><span style="text-indent:0.5in;">The ma</span><span style="text-indent:0.5in;">gician, </span><span style="text-indent:0.5in;">Prospero </span><span style="text-indent:0.5in;">summons a storm to wreck his </span><span style="text-indent:0.5in;">brother’s ship. Prospero takes revenge on his brother who abandoned him on an island so that he can be king.</span>
+
<span style="text-indent:0.5in;">This line refers to Shakespeare’s The Tempest. </span><span style="text-indent:0.5in;">The ma</span><span style="text-indent:0.5in;">gician, </span><span style="text-indent:0.5in;">Prospero </span><span style="text-indent:0.5in;">summons a storm to wreck his </span><span style="text-indent:0.5in;">brother’s ship. Prospero takes revenge on his brother who abandoned him on an island so that he can be king.</span>
   
 
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-indent:.5in">This reference expresses Eliot’s view on the modern world, hopelessness and stranded. People can turn their backs on others, even their family, to satisfy their needs. </p>
 
<p class="MsoNormal" style="text-indent:.5in">This reference expresses Eliot’s view on the modern world, hopelessness and stranded. People can turn their backs on others, even their family, to satisfy their needs. </p>
Line 34: Line 33:
 
|'''Sweeney to Mrs. Porter in the spring.'''
 
|'''Sweeney to Mrs. Porter in the spring.'''
 
|}
 
|}
 
[[File:Giuseppe_Cesari_-_Diana_and_Actaeon_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg|thumb|376px|Diana and Actaeon]]<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="color:black;">        This is yet another criticism of Eliot about how people treat each other. People can do immoral things to each other to satisfy their anger. They do not consider the cause of their actions. </span>        These two lines refer to The Parliament of Bees – a story of Diana (a hunting Goddess) and Actaeon. This is another tragic story revolving about revenge. But this time, vengeance is resulted from anger. Actaeon presents himself at the cave’s entrance, where Diana is taking her bath. Diana dashes the water into Actaeon face with a curse, <span style="color:black;">"Now go and tell, if you can, that you have seen Diana unapparelled." Immediately, Actaeon turns into a stag. With the lost of his speech and appearance, his dogs and his friends do not recognize him – they hunt him down. It is not until the dogs torn his body apart that the anger in Diana is satisfied. </span></p>
[[File:Giuseppe_Cesari_-_Diana_and_Actaeon_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg|thumb|376px|Diana and Actaeon]]
 
 <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="color:black;">        This is yet another criticism of Eliot about how people treat each other. People can do immoral things to each other to satisfy their anger. They do not consider the cause of their actions. </span>        These two lines refer to The Parliament of Bees – a story of Diana (a hunting Goddess) and Actaeon. This is another tragic story revolving about revenge. But this time, vengeance is resulted from anger. Actaeon presents himself at the cave’s entrance, where Diana is taking her bath. Diana dashes the water into Actaeon face with a curse, <span style="color:black;">"Now go and tell, if you can, that you have seen Diana unapparelled." Immediately, Actaeon turns into a stag. With the lost of his speech and appearance, his dogs and his friends do not recognize him – they hunt him down. It is not until the dogs torn his body apart that the anger in Diana is satisfied. </span></p>
 

Revision as of 14:22, 18 March 2013



Musing upon the king my brother’s wreck
And on the king my father’s death before him.

The Tempest

This line refers to Shakespeare’s The Tempest. The magician, Prospero summons a storm to wreck his brother’s ship. Prospero takes revenge on his brother who abandoned him on an island so that he can be king.

This reference expresses Eliot’s view on the modern world, hopelessness and stranded. People can turn their backs on others, even their family, to satisfy their needs. 







The sound of horns and motors, which shall bring

Sweeney to Mrs. Porter in the spring.

Diana and Actaeon

        This is yet another criticism of Eliot about how people treat each other. People can do immoral things to each other to satisfy their anger. They do not consider the cause of their actions.         These two lines refer to The Parliament of Bees – a story of Diana (a hunting Goddess) and Actaeon. This is another tragic story revolving about revenge. But this time, vengeance is resulted from anger. Actaeon presents himself at the cave’s entrance, where Diana is taking her bath. Diana dashes the water into Actaeon face with a curse, "Now go and tell, if you can, that you have seen Diana unapparelled." Immediately, Actaeon turns into a stag. With the lost of his speech and appearance, his dogs and his friends do not recognize him – they hunt him down. It is not until the dogs torn his body apart that the anger in Diana is satisfied.